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Center for Wireless Multimedia Communications

 

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Presenter

 

Dr Shahram Shahbazpanahi, University of Ontario Institute of Technology Toronto, ON, Canada

 

 

 

Title

 

Sum-Rate Maximization for Active Channels

 

 

Time, Place

 

13-14, May 20, 2013

Room 804  New Building, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 

Abstract

 

In this talk, an active channel refers to a parallel channel where gains of the subchannels can be adjusted. We herein study the sum-rate maximization for an active channel subject to two constraints, one on the source total transmit power and one on the total channel power. Although this maximization is not convex, we use the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions to develop a computationally efficient algorithm for optimal source and channel power allocation. To do so, we first show how the KKT conditions can be used to determine the possible number of subchannels that can be active for the source power constraint to be feasible. Indeed, we show that not all subchannels but only a subset of them may receive transmit power from the source. Then, for any feasible number of active subchannels, we obtain the optimal source power allocation. In fact, we prove that for any feasible number of active subchannels, there are only zero, one, or two solutions for the optimal source power allocation. As such, the optimal solution can be obtained by comparing a finite number of points in the  feasible set and by choosing the point which yields the best sum-rate performance. The worst-case computational complexity of our solution is linear in the number of subchannels. Our analysis and simulation results show that active channels can offer significantly higher sum-rate compared to their passive  counterparts which rely on water-filling scheme for source power allocation across subchannels.

 

 

 

Biography

 

Shahram ShahbazPanahi(M'02-SM'10) was born in Sanandaj, Kurdistan, Iran. He received the B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 1992, 1994, and 2001, respectively. From September 1994 to September 1996, he was a faculty member with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Razi University, Kermanshah,Iran. From July 2001 to March 2003, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. From April 2003 to September 2004, he was a Visiting Researcher with the Department of Communication Systems, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany. From September 2004 to April 2005, he was a Lecturer and Adjunct Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University. In July 2005, he joined the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada, where he currently holds an Associate Professor position. Dr. Shahbazpanahi has served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING and the IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LETTERS. He is currently serving as an Associate Editor for the IEEE SIGNAL PROCESSING LETTERS for the second term.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Dr. Shirin Saeedi, Technical University of Munich

 

 

 

Title

 

Broadcasting and Multicasting Nested Message Sets

 

 

 

Time, Place

 

13-14, May 12, 2013

 

 

Abstract

 

With the recent advances in technology, heterogeneous devices have emerged in networks demanding digital media of different quality. Scalable video multicast accommodates users by producing several layers of information: a base layer (which encodes low resolution information and gets the highest priority), and refinement layers (which progressively encode higher levels of resolution and therefore get lower priorities). We ask how such layers can be delivered optimally.

We consider communication of a common message and a private message to a set of receivers where (i) a subset of the receivers demand only the common message and (ii) a subset of the receivers demand both messages. The main problem of interest in this talk is finding optimal encoding schemes at the source, and characterizing reliable rates of communication.

We study this problem over linear deterministic channels and combination networks, and briefly mention our findings over general channels and wireline networks.

 

 

 

Biography

 

Shirin Saeedi is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the technical university of Munich, working with Prof. Gerhard Kramer. She received her PhD and MSc in Communication Systems from the Swiss federal institute of Technology (EPFL), where she was working under the supervision of Prof. Suhas Diggavi and Prof. Christina Fragouli. She received her B.Sc in Electrical Engineering from University of Tehran. Her research interests include multi-terminal communications, network coding, and information theory.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Professor Gerhard Kramer 
Alexander von Humboldt Professor,Head - Institute for Communications Eng. Technische Universität München (TUM) President - IEEE IT Society

 

 

 

Title

 

Impact of Information Theory on Development of New Technologies: Past and Future

 

 

 

Time, Place

 

16-17:30, May 6, 2013

 

 

Biography

 

Gerhard Kramer is Alexander von Humboldt Professor and Head of the Institute for Communications Engineering at the Technische Universität München (TUM). He received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada in 1991 and 1992, respectively, and the Dr. sc. techn. (Doktor der technischen Wissenschaften) degree from the ETH Zürich, Switzerland, in 1998. From 1998 to 2000, he was with Endora Tech AG, Basel, Switzerland, as a communications engineering consultant. From 2000 to 2008 he was with the Math Center, Bell Labs, Alcatel-Lucent, Murray Hill, NJ, as a Member of Technical Staff. He joined the University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, CA, as a Professor of Electrical Engineering in 2009. He joined TUM in 2010.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Professor Gerhard Kramer 
Alexander von Humboldt Professor,Head - Institute for Communications Eng. Technische Universität München (TUM) President - IEEE IT Society

 

 

 

Title

 

Multi-sample Receivers Increase Information Rates for Phase Noise Channels

 

 

 

Time, Place

 

13-14, May 6, 2013

 

 

Biography

 

Gerhard Kramer is Alexander von Humboldt Professor and Head of the Institute for Communications Engineering at the Technische Universität München (TUM). He received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada in 1991 and 1992, respectively, and the Dr. sc. techn. (Doktor der technischen Wissenschaften) degree from the ETH Zürich, Switzerland, in 1998. From 1998 to 2000, he was with Endora Tech AG, Basel, Switzerland, as a communications engineering consultant. From 2000 to 2008 he was with the Math Center, Bell Labs, Alcatel-Lucent, Murray Hill, NJ, as a Member of Technical Staff. He joined the University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, CA, as a Professor of Electrical Engineering in 2009. He joined TUM in 2010.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Dr. Omar M. Ramahi

Professor, IEEE Fellow, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

 

 

 

Title

 

Effective and Meaningful University-Industry Collaboration

 

 

 

Time, Place

 

March 3, 2013 (13 Esfand 1391), 10-12 am

Room 804  New Building, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 

Abstract

 

Academics, by their very nature and by the fundamental mandate of their profession, tend to focus on abstract, theoretical and fundamental principles and methodologies. Industrialists, on the other hand, are focused on the bottom line, irrespective of whether or not the work is based on rigor or scientific correctness. These diverging philosophies or, perhaps more appropriately, conflicting modioperandi, present a barrier between the two groups. Such barrier, not only prevents meaningful collaboration between the two groups, but at times creates a measure of distrust. In this workshop, I will discuss my personal experience in the industry and academy. I will expound on my experience as a consultant and founding partner of two small companies. I will highlight case studies of successful collaborative projects between the industry and my research groups. I will focus on the challenges behind an effective collaboration and emphasize the benefits that can be gained by the two groups. Finally, I will address interdisciplinary challenges that are essential to successful industry-academic collaboration.

 

 

 

Biography

 

Omar M. Ramahi received the BS degrees in Mathematics and Electrical and Computer Engineering (summa cum laude) from Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. From 1990-1993, Dr. Ramahi held a visiting fellowship position at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. From 1993 to 2000, he worked at Digital Equipment Corporation (presently, HP), where he was a member of the alpha server product development group. In 2000, he joined the faculty of the James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland at College Park as an Assistant Professor and later as a tenured Associate Professor. At Maryland he was also a faculty member of the CALCE Electronic Products and Systems Center. Presently, he is a Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and holds the NSERC/RIM Industrial Research Associate Chair, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. He holds cross appointments with the Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering and the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He has authored and co-authored over 290 journal and conference papers. He is a co-author of the book EMI/EMC Computational Modeling Handbook, 2nd Ed. (Springer-Verlag, 2001). Presently, he serves as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Advanced Packaging. Professor Ramahi is an elected IEEE Fellow and has served as an IEEE Electromagnetic Compatibility Society Distinguished Lecturer. In 2012, Professor Ramahi was awarded the IEEE EMC Society Technical Achievement Award.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Dr. Amin Aminzadeh Gohari

 

 

 

Title

 

Broadcast Channels: Transmission strategies and their optimality

 

 

Time, Place

 

14-17, Nov 10, 2012, 14-17, Nov 12, 2012

 

 

Abstract

 

This is a short course on broadcast channels. A broadcast channel is a channel with a single input and multiple outputs. An example could be the downlink of a cellular communication system. Finding the capacity region of even the simple one-transmitter two-receiver case has been a long standing open problem for more than forty years. Nonetheless because of the considerable interest of the information theory community, the problem has been subject of various studies. Our aim is to provide an overview of the past and ongoing activities, and to review some classical and recent results on broadcast channels. Transmission strategies such as superposition coding and Marton coding and their optimality for several classes of broadcast channels will be discussed. We cover the ideas behind some of the recent approaches including factorization ideas, computability of Marton's inner bound as well as symmetrization ideas. This short course assumes the audience has the background of a first course in information theory, but does not assume knowledge of network information theory.
 

 

 

Biography

 

Amin Aminzadeh Gohari received his B.Sc. degree from Sharif University, Iran, in 2004 and his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 2010. He was a postdoc at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Institute of Network Coding. He is currently an assistant professor at Sharif University of Technology. Dr. Aminzadeh Gohari received the 2010 Eli Jury Award from UC Berkeley, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, for "outstanding achievement in the area of communication networks," and the 2009-2010 Bernard Friedman Memorial Prize in Applied Mathematics from UC Berkeley, Department of Mathematics. He also received the Gold Medal from the 41st International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO 2000) and the First Prize from the 9th International Mathematical Competition for University Students (IMC 2002). He was a finalist for the best student paper award at IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory in 2008, 2009 and 2010.

 

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Dr. Mohammad Maddah-Ali, Research Scientist at Bell Labs, NJ, USA

 

 

Title

 

A Tutorial on Interference Management: Recent Approaches

 

 

Time, Place

 

14-17 Saturday, May 26, 2012, 9/30-12/30 Sun, May 26, 2012.

Room 804  New Building, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 

Abstract

The increasing demand for high data rate communication motivates researchers in wireless industry to employ more sophisticated channel configurations. In these configurations, several links communicate simultaneously over shared bandwidth to improve the spectral efficiency. The immediate challenge is to manage the interference of the concurrent links. In this tutorial, we will review some of the very recent techniques and tools to manage and mitigate interference among concurrent links. The talk is organized based on how the channel state information (channel coefficients) may be available at the transmitters' sides.

 

 

 

Biography

 

Mohammad Ali Maddah-Ali received the B.Sc. degree from Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran, in 1997 and the M.A.Sc. degree from the University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran, in 2000, both in electrical engineering with highest rank in classes. From 2002 to 2007, he was with the Coding and Signal Transmission Laboratory (CST Lab), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, working toward the Ph.D. degree. From March 2007 to December 2007, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at theWireless Technology Laboratories, Nortel Networks, Ottawa, ON, Canada, in a joint program between CST Lab and Nortel Networks. From January 2008 to August 2010, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wireless Foundations Center, the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences in the University of California at Berkeley. Since September 2010, he has been at Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent, Holmdel, NJ, as a communication network research scientist. His research interests include wireless communications and multiuser information theory.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Prof. Guy Vandenbosch & Mr. Walter De Raedt

 

 

Title

 

Recent Challenges in Antenna Modeling, Design and Measurement for Wireless Systems

 

 

 

Time, Place

 

10-13 Tuesday, June14, 2011.

Room 201 New Building, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering,

College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 

 

 

Abstract

 

In cooperation with IMEC, the antenna and radiation group of the Katholieke Universities Leuven (KUL) is active in all aspects of antennas. The background of the group ranges from theory, modeling, and software development, over design and prototyping, to measurement. In this presentation, we will start with fundamental antenna theory development. The work at K.U. Leuven mainly focuses on the study of radiated and stored energies in radiating structures. This theory will be applied to small antennas, which yields state-of-the-art results concerning the fundamental bounds on Q. Second, the long-term and strategic activity on antenna modeling and software development will be discussed. The in-house antenna software tool MAGMAS will be introduced. MAGMAS is Method of Moments tool that incorporates ca. 50 man years. In comes with a user-interface and is used within the group as a design and checking tool. It has proven to be highly competitive with the commercial solvers also available within the group. Third, several challenging strategic design lines will be treated. The first line is the realization of Microsystems. Building on the theoretical background and on the knowledge of modeling and designing small antennas, it is very attractive to integrate such antennas in real Microsystems: in this way very compact and high performance wireless modules at increasing frequencies become a reality. Various enabling technologies (integrated passives and RF MEMS technologies) for integrated antennas will be discussed through several examples that were developed in European research projects by IMEC and KUL.

Other lines involve

- the study of new architectures and concepts for electronic beam steering in wireless application

- the study of textile antennas to be integrated in clothing for WBAN

- the study of RFID antennas

- the study of energy harvesting antennas

- the study of mm-wave antennas

- the study of IR and optical nano-antennas, or nantennas.

Fourth, the fabrication and measurement facilities available to the group will be discussed.

 

 

 

Biography

Prof. Guy Vandenbosch was born in Sint-Niklaas, Belgium, on May 4, 1962. He received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Katholieke Universities Leuven, Belgium, in 1985 and 1991, respectively. From 1991 to 1993, he held a postdoctoral research position at the K.U. Leuven. Since 1993, he has been a Lecturer, and since 2005, a Full Professor at this university. His research interests are in the area of electromagnetic theory, computational electromagnetics, planar antennas and circuits, electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic compatibility, and bio-electromagnetics. In the period 1999-2004, he was vice-chairman, and in the period 2005- 2009 secretary of the IEEE Benelux Chapter on Antennas en Propagation. Currently he holds the position of chairman of this Chapter. In the period 2002-2004 he was secretary of the IEEE Benelux Chapter on EMC. Walter De Raedt received his M.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering (1981) from KULeuven, Belgium. From 1981 until 1984 he was working on ebeam technology at K.U. Leuven labs. In 1984 he joined IMEC and until 1997, he was project leader in charge of submicron technologies for advanced HEMT devices. In 1987 he was visiting scientist at IBM Ruschlikon working on fast III-V circuits. From 1997, he joined the MCM group at IMEC in charge of the design, modeling and characterization activities. Currently he is head of the RFCDM group and was involved in many EU research projects (MIPA, 3DμTune, Shift, e-cubes…). In 2003 he received the IEEE microwave prize with his team. He authored and co-authored more than 200 papers and several book chapters in the field of microwave/mmwave modeling, design and packaging. His current interests are in the field of MEMS-based solutions.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Prof. Shahrokh Valaee

 

 

Title

 

How to choose a good project for graduate research?

 

 

Time, Place

 

13 -14 Tuesday, May 31, 2011.

Room 804  New Building, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 

Biography

 

Professor Shahrokh Valaee holds the Nortel Institute junior chair of Computer Networks in the Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto, and from July 2011 he will be the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies. He is the founder and the Director of the Wireless and Internet Research Laboratory (WIRLab) at the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the faculty of the University of Toronto, he was with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University and an adjunct professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology. He is currently an Editor of IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, and IEEE Signal Processing Letters.Prof. Valaee is the Technical Program Co-Chair of IEEE PIMRC 2011.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Prof. Shahrokh Valaee

 

 

Title

 

Vehicular Communication and Networks

 

 

Time, Place

 

14 -17:30, Saturday, May 28,2011,14 -17:30, Monday, May 30, 2011.

School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 

Abstract

 

Car accidents and fatalities beget billion dollar losses annually with human factors the definite cause for 70% of the crashes. Most of such accidents could be prevented if wireless communication and networking devices were installed in cars that allowed vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication. The IEEE 802.11 Task Group “p” is working towards a standard (802.11p), named Wireless Access in Vehicular Environment (WAVE) in 5.9 GHz. In this short course, we will review the techniques and the challenges for cooperative communication in vehicular environment. We will discuss all layers in the communication stack including, applications, WAVE short messaging, IEEE1609 and IEEE802.11p suite of standards, security, resource management, topology transparent scheduling, and the application of network coding in vehicular networks.

 

 

 

Biography

 

Professor Shahrokh Valaee holds the Nortel Institute junior chair of Computer Networks in the Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Toronto, and from July 2011 he will be the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies. He is the founder and the Director of the Wireless and Internet Research Laboratory (WIRLab) at the University of Toronto. Prior to joining the faculty of the University of Toronto, he was with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University and an adjunct professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology. He is currently an Editor of IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, and IEEE Signal Processing Letters.Prof. Valaee is the Technical Program Co-Chair of IEEE PIMRC 2011.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Dr. Mohammad Ali Maddah-Ali, Research Scientist at Bell Labs, NJ, USA

 

 

Title

 

Interference Hiding in Communication and Compression for Wireless Channels

 

 

 

Time, Place

 

11:00–12:00, January 12, 2011.

Shora Room, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 

Abstract

Joint work with Professor David Tse, University of California—Berkeley Part I: Fighting with Delay through Interference Hiding: In interference management, transmitter knowledge of the channel gains can be very important. While in point-to-point channels this knowledge can provide a limited gain in throughput, in multiuser channels, it can also provide multiplicative improvement in data rate. In information theoretic analysis, two extreme assumptions about availability of the channel gain at the transmitter are usually made; either perfect gain information is available at the transmitter, or no gain information is available at all. However, in practical systems, there is usually gain feedback but the feedback is subject to delays. In the first part of the talk, we explain a novel precoding technique to communicate under such delayed feedback through partially hiding the load of interference.

Part II: Exploiting Correlation through Interference Hiding: In the second part of the talk, we focus on a problem of distributed source coding and show that the existing algorithms waste communication bandwidth to report some unneeded information, referred as interference. Such wasteful algorithms are unboundedly loose. Then, we introduce a new technique to hide the load of interference, which improves the required transmission rate significantly and achieve within bounded gap from the ultimate boundaries.

 

 

 

Biography

 

Mohammad Ali Maddah-Ali received B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from Isfahan University of Technology in 1997 (1376), and M.A.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Tehran in 2000 (1379), with highest rank in both classes. During 2002—2007 (1381-1386), he was with the Coding and Signal Transmission Lab., Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Canada, working towards the Ph.D. degree. After working for one year in the Wireless Technology Lab, Nortel Network, Ottawa, Canada, he joined the Wireless Foundations Center, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California—Berkeley, as a post-doctoral fellow. Since Sept. 2010 (Shahrivar 1389), he has been with Bell Labs, Alcatel-Lucent as communication network research scientist. His research interests lie in the general areas of network information theory and wireless communications. Dr. Maddah-Ali is recipient of several awards and honors including rank second in the national entrance exam for graduate (masters) study in Iran, 1997 (1376), Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Post-Doctoral Fellow, 2007 (1386), and honorable mention from IEEE Information Theory Society for introducing the concept of interference alignment 2009 (1388).

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Shahram Shahbazpanahi, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Canada

 

 

 

Title

 

Optimal Distributed Beamforming for Two-Way Relay Networks

 

 

Time, Place

 

13:00-14:00, January 9, 2011.

Shora Room, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 

Abstract

In this talk, we consider a relay network which consists of two single-antenna transceivers and multiple single-antenna relay nodes. Each relay adjusts the phase and the amplitude of the mixture signal it receives from the two transceivers during the first time slot, by multiplying it with a complex beamforming coefficient. Then each relay transmits the so-obtained signal in the second time slot. Aiming at optimally calculating the beamforming coefficients as well as the transceivers’ transmit powers, we study a sum-rate maximization approach. We show that this approach is equivalent to a max-min fair approach where the smallest o f the two transceiver SNRs is maximized while the total transmit power is kept below a certain power budget. We show that this problem has a unique solution which can be obtained through an iterative procedure with a linear computational complexity per iteration. We also prove that this approach leads to a power allocation scheme, where half of the maximum power budget is allocated to the two transceivers and the remaining half will be shared among all the relay nodes. We also devise a distributed scheme which requires a minimal cooperation among the two transceivers and the relays. In fact, we show that the proposed solution can be implemented such that the bandwidth required to obtain the beamforming weights in a distributed manner remains constant as the size of the network grows. To the best of our knowledge, the equivalence between sum-rate maximization and max-min fair approach has not been reported for any other communication scheme. We will further discuss the implications of such an equivalency.

 

 

 

Biography

 

Shahram Shahbazpanahi received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees all in electrical engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 1992, 1994, and 2001, respectively. Since 2005, he has been an assistant professor at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Canada. He serves as associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing and IEEE Signal Processing Letters. He is a member of the IEEE SPS Sensor Array and Multichannel Processing Technical Committee.

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Dr. Amin Mobasher, RIM, Canada

 

 

Title

 

Interference Alignment:Challenges and Possibilities in Future Cellular Systems

 

 

 

Time, Place

 

16:00-17:00, January 4, 2011.

Shora Room, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

Abstract

One of the major challenges in designing wireless networks is the presence of interference. The capacity of a network employing interference avoidance schemes (e.g. FDMA/TDMA) will be limited by interference, regardless of the number of users. Recent results have shown that Interference Alignment (IA) may provide better performance than the schemes based on orthogonalization. The idea of IA is to force the interference from different nodes to be aligned in specific dimensions such that the rest of dimensions are interference-free. In this tutorial paper, we thoroughly review IA concept. Then, we elaborate on its potential feasibility, practical scenarios in which IA can be implemented, and its challenges and limitations.

 

 

 

Biography

 

Dr. Amin Mobasher received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in electrical engineering from Sharif University of Technology in 2000 and 2002, respectively. He earned his Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada in Dec. 2007. From Jan. 2008 till Jan. 2009, he was working as a Member of Technical Staff in the Advanced Technology Lab in Research In Motion (RIM) Limited on LTE and LTE-A 3GPP standards. In 2009, he was with Smart Antenna Research Group (SARG) in Stanford University as a Visiting Scholar/Post-doc. He is now a Member of Technical staff in the Advanced Technology Lab in Research In Motion (RIM) Limited.

His research interests are MIMO-OFDM systems, Interference Mitigation, Relays, Network Coding, Optimization in Communication Systems, and physical layer in 3GPP LTE and LTE-A standards. He has more than 25 referred journal and conference papers. He served as the editor of "Fourth-Generation Wireless Networks: Applications and Innovations" book. He is the recipient of several awards including Ontario Graduate Scholarship and University of Waterloo Presidential Award in 2006. He also received an NSERC Industrial R&D Fellowship and an NSERC postdoctoral Fellowship in 2007 and 2008, respectively. He is serving as IEEE Information Theory Society Online Committee Member, IEEE Kitchener-Waterloo Section Secretary, IEEE Kitchener-Waterloo Information Theory Chapter Chair. He has served as Webmaster and Student Committee Member for IEEE Information Theory Student Resources between Sept. 2005 and Feb. 2008, reviewer for several conference and journal papers, and technical program chair of many conferences

 

 

 

Presenter

 

Prof.  Mohammad Amin Shokrollahi, École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne

 

 

 

Title

 

Fountain Codes for Mobile Communications

 

 

Time, Place

 

13:30-17:00, December 26, 9:00-12:30, December 29, 2010.

School of Electrical & Computer Engineering,College of Engineering (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

Abstract

Fountain Codes are a new class of codes designed for transmission of data on erasure channels with unknown erasure probabilities. Raptor codes form a sub-class of Fountain Codes. They allow for linear time encoding and decoding algorithms. Particularly designed codes from this class approach the capacity of an unknown erasure channel arbitrarily closely. On the theoretical side, I will discuss properties and applications of these codes as erasure correcting codes, and introduce their relationship to threshold phenomena in random graphs. On the practical side, I will introduce some applications of these codes. I will also discuss the design of standardized Raptor codes as used in DVB-H and UMTS standards.

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

Professor Mohammad Amin Shokrollahi has worked on a variety of topics, including coding theory, computational number theory and algebra, and computational/algebraic complexity theory. He is best known for his work on iterative decoding algorithms of graph based codes, an area in which he holds a number of granted and pending patents. He is the co-inventor of Tornado codes, and the inventor of Raptor codes. His codes have been standardized and successfully deployed in practical areas dealing with data transmission over lossy networks. Prior to joining EPFL, Amin Shokrollahi has held positions as the chief scientist of Digital Fountain, member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories, senior researcher at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, and assistant professor at the department of computer science of the university of Bonn. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, and he was awarded the Best Paper Award of the IEEE IT Society in 2002 for his work on iterative decoding of LDPC code, the IEEE Eric Sumner Award in 2007 for the development of Fountain Codes, and the joint Communication Society/Information Theory Society best paper award of 2007 for his paper on Raptor Codes.

 

 

 

 Presenter

 

Prof. G. B. Giannakis, Univ. of Minnesota, USA

 

 

 

 Title

 

Distributed Estimation Using Wireless Sensor Networks

 

 

 

 Time, Place

 

Wednesday, Ordibehesht 25, 1387, 10:30-11:30

School of E&CE, College of Eng. No. 2, University of Tehran

 

 

 

 Biography

 

G. B. Giannakis (Fellow'97) received his Diploma in Electrical Engr. from the Ntl. Tech. Univ. of Athens, Greece, 1981. From 1982 to 1986 he was with the Univ. of Southern California (USC), where he received his MSc. in Electrical Engineering, 1983, MSc. in Mathematics, 1986, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engr., 1986. Since 1999 he has been a professor with the ECE Department at the Univ. of Minnesota, where he now holds an ADC Chair in Wireless Telecommunications.

 

His general interests span the areas of communications, networking and statistical signal processing - subjects on which he has published more than 275 journal papers, 450 conference papers, two edited books and two research monographs. Current research focuses on complex-field and network coding, multicarrier, cooperative wireless communications, cognitive radios, cross-layer designs, mobile ad hoc networks and wireless sensor networks.

 

G. B. Giannakis is the (co-) recipient of six paper awards from the IEEE Signal Processing (SP) and Communications Societies including the G. Marconi Prize Paper Award in Wireless Communications. He also received Technical Achievement Awards from the SP Society (2000), from EURASIP (2005), a Young Faculty Teaching Award and the G. W. Taylor Award for Distinguished Research from the University of Minnesota. He has served the IEEE in a number of posts, and is currently a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE-SP Society.

 

 

 

 Presenter

 

Shahram Yousefi, Department of E&CE, Queen’s University, Canada

 

 

 

 

 

 Title

 

Practical Random Network Coding

 

 

 Time, Place

 

Monday, Azar 12, 1386, 13:30-14:30

Shora Room, School of E&CE, College of Eng. No. 2, University of Tehran

 

 

 

 Biography

 

Prof. Shahram Yousefi, (PhD, P.Eng.), received his B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from University of Tehran, Iran, in 1996. In September 1997, he moved from industry to join the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, where he received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering in September 2002. He then moved to Kingston, ON, Canada, where he is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Queen's University. His research areas of interest are in the general areas of communication and information theory; in particular, channel coding/decoding, performance evaluation of codes, MIMO and space-time codes, and network coding. Dr.Yousefi is the recipient of more than 20 awards, scholarships, and distinctions at the University of Waterloo, Queen's University, and nationally.

 

 

 

 Presenter

 

Maryam Sabbaghian, Department of E&CE, Carleton University, Canada

 

 

 

 Title

 

Turbo Frequency Domain Equalization: Analytical Performance Evaluation and Synchronization Issues

 

 

 

 

 Time, Place

 

Monday, Azar 12, 1386, 15:30-16:3

Shora Room, School of E&CE, College of Eng. (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 Biography

 

Maryam Sabbaghian received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran in 1999 and 2001 respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada in 2007, all in electrical engineering. After a year (2001-2002) as a research associate at Electronics Research Centre, Sharif University of Technology, she was a researcher at Broadband Communications and Wireless Systems (BCWS) Centre at the Dept. of Systems and Computer Eng., Carleton University till Jan. 2004.  Her research interests include wireless communications, iterative systems and frequency domain processing for Beyond-third-generation broadband wireless communication.

 

 

 

 

 Presenter

 

Hamid Behroozi, Department of E&CE, University of Concordia

 

 

 

 

 

 Title

 

Rate-Distortion Regions for Successively Structured Multiterminal Source Coding Schemes

 

 

 Time, Place

 

Sunday, Ordibehesht 30, 1386, 13:00-14:30

Shora Room, School of E&CE, College of Eng. No. 2, University of Tehran

 

 

 Biography

 

Hamid Behroozi received his B.Sc. degree from University of Tehran and his M.Sc. degree from Sharif University of Technology in 2000 and 2003, respectively. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. His research interests include information theory, joint source-channel coding, cooperative communications, and distributed signal processing.

Mr. Behroozi is the recipient of several academic awards including Doctoral Research Scholarship awarded by the Government of Quebec, Hydro Quebec Graduate Award, External Grant Holder Doctoral Scholarship, Concordia University Graduate Fellowship, and Concordia University International Tuition Fee Remission Award.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Presenter

 

Manoochehr Ali Mohammadi, Department of E&CE, Tarbiat Modarres University

 

 

 

 Title

 

MIMO Interference Channel – Research Developments and Prospects

 

 

 

 Time, Place

 

Sunday, Khordad 6th, 1386, 13:00-14:30

Shora Room, School of E&CE, College of Eng. (No. 2), University of Tehran

 

 

 Biography

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last updated May 2013, CWMC

Center for Wireless Multimedia Communications

School of Electrical & Computer Engineering

College of Engineering (Campus No. 2), University of Tehran

North Kargar Ave., Tehran, Iran